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  • PublisherCIBSE
  • Product CodeRR9EC
  • Number of pages16
  • Publication DateOct 2013
  • ISBN

RR9 Embodied carbon and building services (2013) (pdf)

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RR9 Embodied carbon and building services (2013) (pdf)

Building services represent a significant proportion of the capital cost of a typical building, and can account for as much as half the lifecycle expenditure over a thirty-year period. It has been estimated that building services represent between up to 10 - 12% of the total embodied carbon of a typical building, with highly serviced areas such as trading floors, hospital surgical departments and data centres representing the higher end of this range.

Finding ways to reduce resource use in buildings is coming into increasing focus due to the combined pressures of carbon reduction and growing concerns about global supplies of precious metals and other resource intensive raw materials. These are predominantly found in building services systems. There is also a growing regulatory focus on embodied carbon in buildings. This report sets out the current state of knowledge of embodied carbon in relation to building services, and is intended to foster further development of knowledge and guidance in this area. It is published as a CIBSE Research Report, renewing this format for the provision of information on topical subjects for CIBSE members. It also coincides with, and complements, the current WRAP funded work on resource efficiency being undertaken by CIBSE.

Contents :

Foreword
1. Introduction/Scope

2. Definitions, Standards and Guidance Documents 2.1 Definitions
2.2 Standards
2.3 Guidance Documents

3. Some Typical Figures
3.1 How Much Embodied Carbon per Building?
3.2 How Important is the Embodied Carbon of Building Services?
3.3 What is the Impact of Moves towards Zero Carbon?

4. Some Methodological Issues and Practical Considerations
4.1 Product Data
4.2 Delivery, Packaging, Site Work
4.3 Recycling and Reuse

5. Current UK Activity: Who is Doing What?
5.1 Consultancies
5.2 Professional Institutions and Trade Associations 5.3 Academic Institutions

6. What Needs to be Done and by Whom?
6.1 The Current Situation
6.2 Ideally ...
6.3 By whom?

Annex: Examples of Environmental Product Declarations References

Acknowledgements
Author: Roger Hitchin